DAVINCI RESOLVE TUTORIAL: WORKING WITH LOCAL VERSIONS

I’m publishing a series or free articles and tutorials as an introduction to my up-coming Editing and Color Grading Workshops in Berlin.

Next dates are:

All workshops in English and small groups (max 7 students). You can read reviews of my courses here.

If you’re not in Berlin, you may request an on-demand workshop in your city, or one-to-one classes. Let me know: flavioggarcia@gmail.com.

DAVINCI RESOLVE TUTORIAL: LOCAL VERSIONS

This is the situation: we start grading a clip in our Timeline. We get to a result we like. Now we want to try something different: achieve an alterante look, experiment with the style, have different options to present to our clients…

To do this, we use what we call Versions.

There are two kinds of versions: Local Versions and Remote Versions. In this tutorial I focus on Local Versions.

Understanding well how to work with versions is important. It’s part of the basic grading workflow, and makes things easier.

Pay attention now!

WHAT ARE LOCAL VERSIONS?

By default, in DaVinci Resolve we work with Local Versions.

A Local Version affects only the clip where we are, and just the clip where we are. So, we use this when we grade “clip by clip”.

Also by default, all clips have active a Version called Version 1. In other words: anything we do in the grade of any clip happens in this default Version 1.

To see, this, go to the Color Tab, and right click on any Clip:

Image

As you can see in the image above, this clip has Version 1 active.

Whatever we do when we grade this clip, is saved into this Version, including all nodes in the grade. This is: a Version saves everything we do, and all nodes we have.

In this initial Version we typically do our “first” grade.

In my case, have a simple grade with three nodes: one to apply a LUT (V-Log to Rec.709), another one to normalise, and another one to build a look (little bit of Midtone Detail):

Image [3].png
Version 1
All is good!

Now, based on this Version, we want to try other things.

This is what we do: we add another Local Version.

HOW TO ADD A LOCAL VERSION?

Easy.

We go to the clip, right click, Local Versions, Create New Version:

{0BF795BF-7B8D-471D-A7A0-0682771A35CE}.png

Resolve asks us to name the new version.

We may leave the default new name, Version 2:

{3B4136BF-9B58-42A5-8080-4638FD790C8A}.png

Or we can use a different custom name, to maybe describe what we’re going to do in this new grade. For example: Extreme Contrast / Low Saturation:

Image [5]

After clicking OK, a new Local Version is generated, based on the previous one, and including all nodes. Also this new Version is the one that is active now:

Image [4].png

Now we are free to make the changes we wish in this new version, not destroying the previous one.

In my case, I’m going to do what I said when I named the new version: I’m going to increase a lot contrast, and de-saturate:

Image [6]
Version 2: Extreme Contrast / Low Saturation
From here on, every time we want to try something different, we add a new version, name it, and make the required changes.

OK, let’s do another one!

Imagine now I want to, based on Version 2 (High Contrast / Low Saturation), experiment with different tints.

The steps, again, are: right click on the clip, Local Version, Create New Version, then we name it:

STEP ONE

Add new Local Version:

Image [7]

STEP TWO

Name the new version:

Image [8]

Result: now we have three versions, and the active one is the third:

Image [9]

Now we modify this version.

In my case, I’m going to spin around Hue, and tint using curves:

Image [10].png
Version 3: Hue and color tint with curves
Got it, right?

Adding a new Local Versions allows us to work based on what we did before, and experiment, keeping the previous ones intact.

HOW TO SWAP FROM VERSION TO VERSION?

Now comes the fun.

In any time, we can go back and load any of the previous versions.

There are two ways.

FIRST WAY

Right click on the clip, we go to the Version we want to load, and click Load:

Image [11]

SECOND WAY

We can switch to other versions with keyboard commands:

  • Command/Control + N, go from Version to Version forward.
  • Command/Control + B, go from Version to Version backwards.

This second way is my favourite. It’s just fun and useful to explore all the different versions, and understand where we’re going.

As you can see in the image above, when we right click on a clip and go to a Version, we also find options to rename it (Rename), and Delete it.

Warning: It’s not possible to delete a version we have active in this moment. To delete a Version, we always need to do it from a different version.

HOW TO ADD A VERSION TO START FROM SCRATCH?

Now suppose we want to add another Version, but this time not based on a previous version, but a “clean” one, so we can grade from scratch.

Remember: when we add a new Local Version, it’s always generated based on the one we have loaded now.

So, to have new version completely clean, the solution is:

  • From any version, we add a new Local Version.
  • We reset that new version.

To reset completely a version, deleting all nodes, we use the command Command/Control + Home.

We also find the other Reset options up in the Color menu:

Image [12]

HOW TO COMPARE VERSIONS?

One of the most useful (and cute) things we can do with versions is compare them.

For that, we use Split Screen.

Step by step:

STEP ONE

We activate Split Screen in the Viewer:

Image [13].png

STEP TWO

On the right side of the Viewer, we select the comparison method. In this case, Version:

Image [14].png

This displays all versions at the same time.

Cool, isn’t it?

The active version is the one highlighted.

In this view, we can activate other versions just by double clicking on them.

As an alternative, we can use the comparison method Versions and Original:

Image [15]

This displays all versions, and also the original clip, ungraded.

Split Screen also supports full screen, Cinema Viewer.

To activate it, use the command Command/Control + F:

Image [16].png

To exist Cinema Viewer, we simply press ESC.

And to exit Split Screen, we simply click on the same icon where we activated before.

There you are!

Local Versions: one the most basic and useful tools in DaVinci Resolve, so we can work safe and explore the creativity of the grade.

If you have questions, write a comment below.

And if you are interested in my workshops, find dates and information at the top of this page.

Happy grading!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.